Educational Resources

Educators, parents, and students adapting to changes in education brought on by the public health emergency can benefit from these helpful resources:

GOVERNMENT

Indiana Department of Education’s Office of Curriculum and Instruction has created a 2020 COVID-19 Remote Learning page that will be updated continuously throughout the next several weeks. The exhaustive list of resources is suitable for both educators and families.

Indianapolis Public Library digital collections offers cardholders free access to e-books, music, movies, audiobooks, online courses, and more. While libraries are closed, library staff are available to help with e-book reading suggestions, questions, and reference help. Call 317-275-4184, or text 317-333-6877 during regular Central Library hours, or message @IndyPL on social media.

IPS Home Learning Plan will help students complete the school year. Indianapolis Public Schools has mailed K–8 students a paper/pencil packet learning pathway. The weekly plans are also available for download. High school students use an e-learning platform that provides access to resources and materials, and also allows for instruction, feedback, and conversation.

Purdue Extension 4-H Youth Development team has assembled a list of at-home learning resources for families that allow students to explore nature and science at home. Topics include animal science, computer science, engineering and technology, and plant and environmental science.

MIDTOWN NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis is providing free virtual tours and fun things to do at its online Museum-At-Home.

In addition, educators and families schooling at home can use free study tools in science and humanities topics, categorized by school grade levels.

Indianapolis Art Center provides Resources for Families: creative ideas for projects and materials both indoors and outdoors. “The Art of Reading” book readings of children’s art books from the Art Center’s library are posted every Thursday afternoon to the IAC’s You Tube channel.

Indianapolis Opera continues to champion the vocal arts through a series of e-learning videos for K–12 students. Downloadable curricula help seasoned educators as well as parents-turned-educators craft an appropriate educational experience for students.

Indy Learning Team posts its weekly Favorite Five: the five top educational activities to do with kids. Free downloadable resources are for preschoolers to 4th graders.

Indy Pride has a substantial list of community resiliency resources, including self-education options for LGBTQ families and friends.

Newfields at Home offers virtual access to the natural beauty of the closed 52-acre site as well as how-to arts and crafts videos to spur creativity at home.

SELECT INDY NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

Keep Indianapolis Beautiful offers video nature lessons suitable for young students who are looking for a fun way to explore the outdoors in their own backyard or seeking out a virtual project to do with friends online. KIB is continuously updating with new activities.

Kheprw Institute’s Pandemic Community Resource Bank links to several online educational resources for learners of all ages.

Reconnecting to Our Waterways (ROW) offers its Illustrated Nature Guide and Journal for free download along with other resources to help students and their families creatively explore nearby urban natural spaces.

SELECT NATIONAL NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

The Children & Nature Network offers weekly updates to its Finding Nature resources that promote staying connected to the natural world for regular doses of Vitamin “N” during COVID-19.

The National Archives and Records Administration has outstanding resources for at-home learning for Elementary, Middle School and High School students. Educator resources are also available. The variety of materials in the archives is impressive.

The National Audubon Society’s Audubon for Kids! assembles activities from the organization’s national network of environmental educators, including classroom curriculum and related DIY activities and content from Audubon’s editors. These activities can be done at home or in a yard or park, sometimes with the help of a computer to help connect young people to the natural world.